Parents upset over Jordan School District's proposed boundary changes

Parents upset over Jordan School District's proposed boundary changes

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - The Jordan School District is considering some drastic changes after voters turned down a $495 million dollar bond. The most drastic of which would mean changing boundaries and busing thousands of students several miles to schools outside their neighborhood.

SOUTH JORDAN, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - The Jordan School District is considering some drastic changes after voters turned down a $495 million dollar bond. The most drastic of which would mean changing boundaries and busing thousands of students several miles to schools outside their neighborhood.

 

11 new schools, two rebuilds and other major renovation projects - that's what the bond would have meant for the Jordan School District, but a majority of residents voted it down.

 

"We just didn't have an understanding of where that money would be spent,” said concerned parent Travis Johnson.

 

Parent Jamie Larsen agrees, telling ABC 4 Utah, "I don't think the district put out there what's going to happen if the bond failed. The only thing we knew about the bond was it was a lot of money."

 

Now without that money the district is facing some difficult decisions, like more year around schools, more portable classrooms and, the most drastic, boundary changes that could leave kids being bussed to schools outside their neighborhoods.

 

Back in November Jordan School District Director of Communication Sandy Riesgraf told ABC 4 Utah, "Children in really high growth areas, like Herriman, would be bussed past their neighborhood school, where there are no seats, to perhaps West Jordan, where we do have schools with a few seats."

 

That was a major shock to these parents who just got the boundary change proposals sent home with their kids just before Christmas break.

 

"They're splitting our neighborhood right in half,” said Larsen. "There are houses in this area where a house facing the same way, the house next to it will go to a different school. Your neighbor would go to a different school."

 

In all four plans the district is proposing it would mean these parents children would have to move to an older school miles away while other students would be bussed in to their take their child's seat.

 

Larsen told ABC 4 Utah, "We expected we'd go year around, we didn't expect they've move so many students into and push our neighborhood right out."

 

So they're asking the district for time. A community meeting will be held Monday night to come up with alternative proposals that might work for everyone.

 

"Our goal is with as many schools as are impacted, there’s twelve schools in total impacted by these boundary changes, we want to hear what they all have to say and together really come up with a solution that works best for our children and for the district,” explained Johnson.

 

The community meeting is taking place Monday December, 30th at 7 p.m. at the South Jordan Community Center.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus