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Mine Landslide researchers cover national magazine

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC4 - Utah) Last year’s landslides at the Kennecott mine were so massive, they caused 16 smaller earthquakes. A report done by researchers with the University of Utah is on the cover of this month’s Geological Society of America magazine GSA Today.
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC4 - Utah) Last year’s landslides at the Kennecott mine were so massive, they caused 16 smaller earthquakes. A report done by researchers with the University of Utah is on the cover of this month’s Geological Society of America magazine GSA Today. 

Fortunately, the landslides were detected before it occurred, so everyone was evacuated and there were no injuries.

The slides moved at 70 miles per hour and hit 100 mph at times.

It is not unusual for earthquakes to trigger a landslide, but this is the only landslide known to have done the opposite.

Scientists say what is really important is how these slides can help save lives in the future.

“So when this slide occurred, nobody was hurt or killed,” said Jeffrey Moore, an Assistant Professor of Geology at the U of U. “Landslides of this size across the world kill people. They move at extreme speeds and if they're not detected they can be quite deadly.”

Moore said the slides were so big, if all the debris was piled into Liberty Park in Salt Lake City, it would be 545 ft tall.

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