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Four Bald Eagles die mysteriously, another sick

OGDEN, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - The sign of freedom is now the center of a mystery. Wildlife experts have no answers as to why five bald eagles suddenly became ill. Four of them died and another is still struggling to survive from an unknown ailment.

OGDEN, Utah (ABC 4 Utah)- The sign of freedom is now the center of a mystery. Wildlife experts have no answers as to why five bald eagles suddenly became ill. Four of them died and another is still struggling to survive from an unknown ailment.

Bald eagles are a sign of our nation’s democracy. Hunters have found five of them not flying, barely breathing, and in bad shape.

“One of our officers received a report from a hunter that there was a bald eagle on the ground,” said Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Communications Specialist Amy Tanning.

The wildlife officer brought the bald eagle to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah. The same place four other birds were brought, before mysteriously dying.

“Right now we're doing everything we can do with a lot of support and care. But without knowing what we're treating it can be very difficult and we don't even know if it’s something we can treat,” said Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah Executive Director Dalyn Erickson-Marthaler.

But the fifth bird has the same sad symptoms as the others.

“He has leg paralysis, he's missing his wing. He does not have as bad of tremors as the other ones had, so that gives us a little bit of hope,” said Erickson-Marthaler.

Five birds in the same month all suffering until four died. The last one could be the only survivor.

“Right now he's stable, but it's kind of hard to speculate what's going to happen with him, we just don't know,” said Erickson-Marthaler.

And it may take the next two weeks to decide what caused it. Poison? Virus? The inversion? Wildlife experts say they don’t want to guess, but wait for the official lab results.

“We sent the other four eagles off to a lab for testing and we should have results in two weeks to know what caused this,” said Tanning.

The bald eagle population in Utah goes up during the winter months as the bird stop here during their migration season. So, wildlife experts want you to be on the lookout for any more bald eagles who could be in distress.

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