68°F
Sponsored by

Utah medicine man speaks out about dying eagles

The Division of Wildlife Resources says 42 bald eagles in Utah have died since December and a sixth eagle is now in rehab at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (ABC 4 UTAH) – The Division of Wildlife Resources says 42 bald eagles in Utah have died since December and a sixth eagle is now in rehab at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah. With all the recent deaths, ABC 4 Utah wanted to know the affect it has on our native community right here in Utah.

“We believe because the eagle flies so high it carries our prayer to the creator so of course we always respect and hold high regard for that eagle because of that responsibility and role that it does have,” said Lacee Harris a medicine man from the Northern Ute Tribe.

Harris grew up in Fort Duchesne Utah on a reservation. He says learning that 42 bald eagles died after catching West Nile virus from thousands of dead infected eared grebes along the shore of the Great Salt Lake is worrisome. “I use this feather that is 35 years old at a lot at ceremonies where people have perform ceremonies for them for their health.”  

One of the places Harris uses his sacred eagle feather is at the Huntsman Cancer Institute  where he volunteers weekly to help those who are ill and want a blessing.

As of Friday, the division of Wildlife Resources says 42 bald eagles have died and six are in rehabilitation at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Northern Utah. DWR says the birds are in serious condition and will likely be there for months. However, they do say less reports of ill eagles are coming in and that is something Harris is calling a blessing itself.

“Our prayers our being answered because our sacred objects are being taken care of by our prayers,” said Harris.

DWR was not available for an interview Friday, but when asked if they plan to pick up the dead eared grebes along the shore of the Great Salt Lake, believed to be infecting the eagles feeding off them, they said they do not see the birds as a threat because the virus only lasts a short period of time. 

 

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
local-businesses.png
cars.png dixie-local.jpg

Popular Stories on Facebook