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Tale of two cities: Inversion creates two different Utah climates

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 News) - It's another day of less than perfect air in the valley. Today is your typical inversition day in the valley. It's dreary, mucky, foggy, you can hardly make out downtown unless you're standing on top of it but just a few miles down the road and up a couple thousand feet you get above the inversion into clear, blue, sunny skies.
Bad air (Bill Brussard, ABC 4 News)
Bad air (Bill Brussard, ABC 4 News)
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 News) - It's another day of less than perfect air in the valley. Today is your typical inversition day in the valley. It's dreary, mucky, foggy, you can hardly make out downtown unless you're standing on top of it but just a few miles down the road and up a couple thousand feet you get above the inversion into clear, blue, sunny skies.

Typically our temperatures go down with height, not the case in an inversion. Normally you could see downtown from the mouth of Parley's Canyon but not today. This is what it looks like when cold air is trapped at the surface. Cloudy, and mid 30s in the Salt Lake Valley, elevation 4200 feet. Meantime it's sunny and low 40s in Park City, elevation 7000 feet. It's truly a tale of two cities.

Visitors often don't know what they're experiencing. One skier visiting from New York was actually afraid to drive through the inversion when coming through Parley's Canyon because he'd never seen anything like it in his life. Others thought it was simply a storm moving in.

A storm moving in would be a good thing. Our next chance to scour out this air will be on Wednesday. Until then, you'll have to travel up above the inversion layer to see a little sunshine and to feel some warmer temperatures.
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