Supreme Court grants stay, same-sex marriages put on hold in Utah

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) - Marriages for gay and lesbian Utahns were temporarily stopped today by a United States Supreme Court judge Sonia Sotomayor.
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) - Marriages for gay and lesbian Utahns were temporarily stopped today by a United States Supreme Court judge Sonia Sotomayor.

Earlier Monday the judge granted the state of Utah a stay on Amendment 3.

Attorney General Sean Reyes says, "It is unfortunate that many Utah citizens have been put into this legal limbo. But we are evaluating there legal status currently."

That legal limbo for the Utah's gay and lesbian community is now in jeopardy do to the hold on same sex marriage. Amendment 3 was overturned on December 20th by District Judge Robert Shelby allowing Same Sex marriages. In the ruling the district judge said it was unfair for same sex couples who were not receiving the same rights as heterosexual couples.

"There is no harm in gay families. They are just like everyone else. We just want the acceptance and the support of the community to help build a better community," said State Senator Jim Dabakis.

Though it is disappointing for hundreds of of Utahns who have been married since the December ruling, Governor Gary Herbert and Attorney General Sean Reyes are happy with the stay granted today.

"Going forward I can say that we feel we are on solid ground because the stay is in place," said Utah's Attorney General Reyes.

It's a place where the attorney general is now calling for outside council to battle the same sex ruling by Judge Shelby. Applications are due by Tuesday January 7th, 2013.

The case can cost Utah's taxpayers up words of $2 million.

"I just have a hard time seeing how the governor and the attorney general can celebrate the fact that they have destroyed loving Utah families," State Senator Dabakis.

The 10th District United States Supreme court has set a deadline of January 27th for the two parties to come up with written statements for the court to hear. A deadline both parties say can be moved up.

"I see it very clearly heading to the United States Supreme Court. I see the justices sitting down and wrestling with this issue and making this decision," State Senator Jim Dabakis added. It's a decision he feels will be decided for the whole United States.

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