Religious freedom advocates celebrate Supreme Court ruling

"Today's decision is a landmark decision for religious freedom," said Lori Windham, Hobby Lobby’s lawyer, on Monday.

WASHINGTON D.C. (ABC 4 Utah) – The Supreme Court settled a debate dividing the entire country, Monday, after several corporations challenged the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate.

The ruling is a victory for religious freedom advocates but a blow to Obamacare. 

"We will consider whether or not there is an opportunity for the President to take some other action that could mitigate this problem," affirmed Josh Earnest, Press Secretary for the White House. 

Family-owned corporations can now refuse to pay for employees’ contraception because the Supreme Court found it difficult to separate people from the businesses they run.  The court ruled that “closely-held” companies, like Hobby Lobby, have the right to claim religious freedom. 

"Today's decision is a landmark decision for religious freedom," said Lori Windham, Hobby Lobby’s lawyer, on Monday.

In a 5-4 ruling, Hobby Lobby won the case.  Pro-choice advocates agree it is a landmark decision, but not for the same reasons.

"We know there are religions who don't believe in immunizations, we know there are religions who don't believe in transfusions.  Will personal religious beliefs on healthcare be able to creep in?" asked Karrie Galloway, CEO of Planned Parenthood Assoc. of Utah.

Galloway’s question is one that many have voiced concern over.  Some say personal beliefs should most-definitely play a role. 

"The people who own the company have the right to decide what they provide or don't provide," said Chantel Hart, a religious freedom advocate and Hobby Lobby shopper.   

Others disagree.

"It's hard when you put that belief on so many other people who may need [contraception] in their lives," said Chantel Hart, another Hobby Lobby Shopper.  

Some just do not care.

"I'm too old to worry about that kind of thing!” said another shopper who wanted to remain unnamed.

Utah Senator Mike Lee commended the Supreme Court.

"Americans do not shed their religious freedoms merely by going into business.  The court's ruling upholds and strengthens the rights of individuals and the rule of the law, while protecting the constitution,” Lee said.

In order for a corporation to qualify as "closely held,” 50 percent of its stock has to be held by five people or less.  This ruling will not affect large corporations outside those parameters.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus
local-businesses.png
cars.png dixie-local.jpg

Top Stories

Popular Stories on Facebook