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As temperatures grow, so do concerns for pregnant women

As summer temperatures heat up, we can all get a little uncomfortable, especially pregnant women. In our continued partnership with Intermountain Medical Center, we tackle the heat and its impact on expectant mothers.
As summer temperatures heat up, we can all get a little uncomfortable, especially pregnant women. In our continued partnership with Intermountain Medical Center, we tackle the heat and its impact on expectant mothers. 

Lisa Allred gets a seal of approval at her latest check-up.  As her baby grows, so do the temperatures outside.

"I always have water with me. That's just a little reminder to try to drink a little bit," said pregnant woman Lisa Allred.

It doesn't take long for anyone to get dehydrated, especially expecting mothers.

"Obviously they're carrying another body within them and that increase their body heat. And there's a lot of changes in fluid balance during pregnancy so your need for fluids increase," said  Intermountain Medical Center Certified Nurse Midwife Martie Nightengale.

Heat stroke could induce labor and that only leads to complications.  Intermountain Medical Center Certified Nurse Midwife Martie Nightengale says she gets the most calls on Independence Day and Pioneer Day.

"They're maybe having contractions and they're overheated and not feeling well so we do get that quite a bit," said Nightengale.

But you don't have to stay cooped up indoors  If you were active before pregnancy, research shows exercising while pregnant is a good thing in moderation.

"One day you might run a 5k with ease and another day one mile is enough. Just pay attention what works for you on a given day," said Nightingale.

And not just heat, but summer means more traveling.

"No where your nearest hospital is. If you're going far away have a copy of your medical records," said Nightingale.

Nightingale says moms have to listen to their bodies.  Because Lisa is expecting her second child, she's full of advice for first time moms.

"From the minute you get up start drinking instead so you don't get tot the point where you already are dehydrated," said Allred.

Here are four tips from Intermountain Medical Center to keep in your pregnant or planning to be pregnant during the summer months:
1. Bring hydration with you.
2. Take breaks.
3. Wear breathable clothing.
4. Don't over exert during 10am to 4pm

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