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Closing arguments delivered in Martin MacNeill trial

PROVO, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - The state did not mince words when addressing the jury in closing arguments Friday.
PROVO, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - The state did not mince words when addressing the jury in closing arguments Friday.

"The case is dripping with motive and without questions it tells you why the defendant killed his wife Michele."

The state says the jury has to look no further than to the military ID Martin MacNeill got for his mistress Gypsy Willis - in which they falsified their date of marriage as the same day as his wife Michele was laid to rest.

"Ladies and gentlemen that is nothing short of an admission of guilt."

Going back to the day Michele died - the state asks the jury to consider a question many have likely had: Why couldn't Martin get Michele out of the tub? Their answer: he didn't want to.

"Ladies and gentlemen what about getting inside the tub and maybe straddling her, grabbing her from her shoulder pulling her maybe rolling her over, getting her on the ground to where he could actually perform life saving measures."

Autopsy reports showed when Michele died she had several central nervous system depressants in her system - like ambien and valium.

The defense, in its closing arguments said it has not been proven Martin Macneill actually gave the drugs to his wife.

"There is not a single bit of credible evidence that anybody other than Michele MacNeill administered that medication to her that morning."

While MacNeill's motive to kill Michele seems to clearly point to his affair with Gypsy Willis - the defense poses the question, “When Michele passed away is it so surprising Martin would seek to move his mistress into a more prominent role?”

It all boils down to burden of proof. The defense says there's no way the jury in this case can find Martin MacNeill guilty of murder beyond a reasonable doubt.

"If medical examiners can review all this information and cannot conclude it was a homicide then how can you as jurors?"

The state disagrees and told the jury in rebuttal, “The fact that they don't find homicide is a limitation of their role and a limitation of their role and a limitation of their science. It means nothing when deciding culpability."

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