Solution to Utah's illegal immigration problem?

Solution to Utah's illegal immigration problem?

WEST JORDAN, Utah (ABC 4 News) - Undocumented workers feel like their options are running out as Utah lawmakers draft a bill similar to Arizona's immigration law.

WEST JORDAN, Utah (ABC 4 News) - Undocumented workers feel like their options are running out as Utah lawmakers draft a bill similar to Arizona's immigration law.

Utah has the fastest growing illegal alien population in the country.  There is an estimated 100,000 undocumented people in the State, but what happens if an illegal family tries to do the right thing?

A Utah family found out.  This story is about a Mexican citizen who crossed the boarder illegally and married a United States citizen.

He traveled back to Mexico Aug. 18, 2009 to apply for a visa.  His visa was denied, he was detained and now his family is split. 

"It's hard. It's really hard," said wife Brenda Garibay who now lives in West Jordan. 

She returned to the Untied States with out her husband Oscar Garibay.  One child stayed with him and one child returned with her.  "My husband is supposed to be here with his family," Garibay said.

She says leaving her husband in Mexico meant loosing his income, their home and two cars.  She even lived homeless for two weeks.

Now she rents a room from a friend as she works to support her husband living in Mexico City.  He says he only makes $15 a day driving a taxi.

Brenda says living in Mexico is not an option for her.  "If I go over there it would be really hard because I have no friends.  I have no family.  I have all my friends my family my work my school here," said Garibay.

Oscar must wait another 6 months to find out if he qualifies for a visa.  If everything goes right Oscar will be a U.S. citizen in 5 years. 

"We did everything the right way.  Everything they asked for us to do we did," said Garibay.

There is another side to this story.  Illegal immigrants cost Utah tax payers hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

Republican Rep. Chris Herrod from Provo says Utah taxpayers spend $100 million to educate children from undocumented families, $12 million to incarcerate undocumented workers and he claims undocumented workers have doubled demand on charitable hospitals in the last four years, forcing many to close. 

So what is the solution?  We want to know what you think.  You can leave your thoughts in the comment section below.


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