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Woman who lived homeless in the streets shares how the Rescue Mission of Salt Lake helped her

12/06/2017 - SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC4 News) When you think of being homeless, you probably worry about how hard it would to not have a bed to sleep in, or know where regular meals would come from. Chris Croswhite, Executive Director of the Rescue Mission of Salt Lake, and Catrina Aniano, who knows what it's like to be homeless, joined Brian Carlson to talk about how the Rescue Mission of Salt Lake steps in to help.

Coswhite has been working with the homeless for over 12 years, and Aniano is a student in their New Life Recovery Program. She has lived an active homeless lifestyle for 2 years. Aniano has lived in the down town area, but because it can be so dangerous for women in this area, most of her time she leaved off of Redwood Road in the Taylorsville area. Aniano refused to come to service providers because she feared they would just call the police and put her in jail.

Some statements that came from Catrina personally, about her life and fears on the streets:

Sometimes during the winter months I would walk around throughout the entire night because I knew if I stopped somewhere outside to lay down I would more than likely freeze to death, be mugged, or something almost as bad as death would happen if the wrong person walked by while I was asleep.

· If I needed a shower, a place to hang out , rest my head or wash my clothes, I knew I could accept one of the 4-5 offers I got a day, and get my needs met with sexual favors being the payment.

· I would trade sex for a motel room for the night, and I'd also ask for money to buy drugs to numb myself from the disgust and guilt I felt from the decisions I had to make to survive on the streets.

· I always thought that I if went to a place for help, they would run my name and see my warrants and blindside me by calling the cops, or would call the cops if I was high on drugs. I was afraid to even ask for help.

· I was so desperate that I used my sexuality, or whatever I could to manipulate men and women to get what I wanted.

· Being on drugs, the last people I wanted to see were people who were "the norm," because I felt so different from them.

· I never bothered to watch the news because nothing ever applied to me, so the chance of ever seeing a message of hope was very rare.

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah (ABC4 News) When you think of being homeless, you probably worry about how hard it would to not have a bed to sleep in, or know where regular meals would come from. Chris Croswhite, Executive Director of the Rescue Mission of Salt Lake, and Catrina Aniano, who knows what it's like to be homeless, joined Brian Carlson to talk about how the Rescue Mission of Salt Lake steps in to help.

Coswhite has been working with the homeless for over 12 years, and Aniano is a student in their New Life Recovery Program. She has lived an active homeless lifestyle for 2 years. Aniano has lived in the down town area, but because it can be so dangerous for women in this area, most of her time she leaved off of Redwood Road in the Taylorsville area. Aniano refused to come to service providers because she feared they would just call the police and put her in jail.

Some statements that came from Catrina personally, about her life and fears on the streets:

Sometimes during the winter months I would walk around throughout the entire night because I knew if I stopped somewhere outside to lay down I would more than likely freeze to death, be mugged, or something almost as bad as death would happen if the wrong person walked by while I was asleep.

· If I needed a shower, a place to hang out , rest my head or wash my clothes, I knew I could accept one of the 4-5 offers I got a day, and get my needs met with sexual favors being the payment.

· I would trade sex for a motel room for the night, and I'd also ask for money to buy drugs to numb myself from the disgust and guilt I felt from the decisions I had to make to survive on the streets.

· I always thought that I if went to a place for help, they would run my name and see my warrants and blindside me by calling the cops, or would call the cops if I was high on drugs. I was afraid to even ask for help.

· I was so desperate that I used my sexuality, or whatever I could to manipulate men and women to get what I wanted.

· Being on drugs, the last people I wanted to see were people who were "the norm," because I felt so different from them.

· I never bothered to watch the news because nothing ever applied to me, so the chance of ever seeing a message of hope was very rare.

Croswhite says at any time, women can come into the Rescue Mission and find refuge. Crisis counselors are always available to talk to them, and emergency shelter is provided every night for women who don't have a place to stay. Croswhite says their goal with the crisis shelter is that women will get to know the staff, and join the inpatient recovery program. The program helps them leave their life on the streets.

Croswhite says they are looking for people to sponsor women for the inpatient recovery program, or who can help out here and there by feeding the homeless or volunteering. To do that, go to RescueSaltLake.org. He says you can also give out Help Cards that are found on the website, to women you see who are living on the streets. 

This story contains sponsored content.

This story contains sponsored content.


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