Congress looking into a ban on "bump stocks"

Legal kits modify semi-automatic weapons to function as fully automatic

WASHINGTON DC (ABC4 Utah News) -Police say Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock used semi-automatic rifles that had been modified to function as fully automatic weapons in his assault that killed 58 people Sunday night. Now politicians are discussing banning those kits called "bump stocks".


The legal kits fit onto semi-automatic rifles transforming the firing mechanism from one shot per trigger squeeze to a continuous spray of bullets.

Thursday Kellyanne Conway blamed the Obama administration for not banning the devices.

"2010, the Obama administration's Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Bureau said they wouldn't regulate that device," conway said.

It was a hot topic Thursday on Capitol Hill with Congress members from both parties saying they are willing to look into a bump stock ban.

"Was it a regulatory misstep by ATF some number of years ago?" Speaker of the House Paul Ryan asked. "We all know and believe that fully auto weapons are illegal so is this a big gap that needs to be closed and if so how to close it."

"Certainly the public pressure in terms of bump stock is such that we would pass it if they bring it to the floor," House Minority Leader Nacy Pelosi said.

Rep. David Ciciline (D - New Hampshire) sees it as an opportunity to bring both sides of the aisle together.

"It think it would be a great moment to show the country we can work together in a bipartisan way to address this issue," Rep. Ciciline said.

Thursday afternoon, the National Rifle Association issued a statement calling on the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms to immediately review whether bump stocks comply with federal law.


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