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Governor's office responds to accusations inversion a "public health emergency"

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 News) - "It's a public health emergency" - that's what a group of Utah Doctors told the Governor this week about the state's inversion. But what's happening to fix the problem? ABC4 got answers from the Governor and DAQ.
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 News) - "It's a public health emergency" - that's what a group of Utah Doctors told the Governor this week about the state's inversion. But what's happening to fix the problem? ABC4 got answers from the Governor and DAQ.

Wednesday 100 Utah Doctors sent a letter to the Governor, demanding a solution to the inversion and the health problem it was creating for people forced to breath the air.

Dr. Kirtly Jones from Salt Lake City said during a press conference Wednesday, "We have to protect the women who are choosing to get pregnant and the babies they are carrying."

Friday the Governor's office sent us a statement in response to the allegations. The Governor's Deputy Chief of Staff Ally Isom wrote, "the State of Utah and its agencies will absolutely continue to enforce all Air Quality Regulations to their fullest extent."

To that Bryce Bird, the Director of Utah's Department of Air Quality, told ABC 4 News, "There are federal standards in place that are based on the same scientific research the doctors used that show we need to do a better job meeting those standards."

While the state continues to work out a better solution, for now the State is asking each of us to monitor what we are contributing to the Inversion.

Byrd said, "Automobiles are responsible for over half of the emissions we have in the valley."

And the Governor's office: "This is as much an issue of personal responsibility as it is a matter of public policy."



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