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Infamous criminal to be released from prison

SALT LAKE CIT, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - An infamous criminal is about to go free. Adam Swapp who made headlines in 1988 will be released from the Utah state prison after spending twenty-five-and-a-half years behind bars.
SALT LAKE CIT, Utah (ABC 4 Utah) - An infamous criminal is about to go free. Adam Swapp who made headlines in 1988 will be released from the Utah state prison after spending twenty-five-and-a-half years behind bars.

He was convicted of manslaughter in the death of Corrections Officer Fred House and bombing an LDS church in 1988. But Swapp was not responsible for killing House.

“I did shoot at the lights that were above the officers which I shouldn't have done and I should never have shot at them,” Swapp told a Board of Pardons hearing officer in September, 2012. “I was wrong in all of my actions. But I can say with an open heart I never did shoot at any officer."

It was during that hearing that Swapp showed that he had remorse and was a changed man. He was facing a maximum of 30-years in prison for the two charges.

"I had an old testament mindset,” Swapp told the hearing officer. “It was about the letter of the law. It wasn't about the spirit of the law. What I've come to learn is that how I acted is completely wrong."

Swapp expressed remorse and apologized to the House family. Fred House was the officer who was killed at the end of the 13-day standoff in 1988.

"I should not have done what I did,” Swapp said at the hearing. “If I could go back and redo it, I certainly would."

In 1988, polygamist’s Swapp and brother-in-law Timothy Singer were convicted of bombing an LDS church in Kamas. It was in retaliation for polygamist leader John Singer's death at the hands of law enforcement in the 1970’s.

At his 2012 parole hearing, Swapp offered an apology to the man he killed.

"Dear Fred, I am so very, very sorry for causing your death,” Swapp appeared to be emotional as he spoke before the hearing officer. “I pray that you will forgive me, for causing your death and for all the heartache I've caused your family all these many years. I stand ashamed Fred for what I've done to you and your family.”

And after 25 plus years, the board of parole was convinced that Swapp was a changed man. But it was a letter from Fred House's widow that may have helped set Swapp free.

"She has come to a point where she feels you have served enough time,” hearing officer Jess Gallegos said as he was holding a letter from Ann House. “She now accepts your apology and feels that enough time has been spent behind solid walls."

On Tuesday, July 9th, Swapp will be reunited with his family. He told the hearing officer he plans to live in Fairview amongst family members.

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