ABC4 gets its first look at Chevron's diesel spill cleanup

ABC4 gets its first look at Chevron's diesel spill cleanup

WILLARD, Utah (ABC 4 News) – It’s been more than three weeks since the Chevron diesel spill in Willard Bay. ABC 4’s Kimberly Nelson has been pressuring Chevron, the Division of Water Quality and the state parks department about getting a first-hand look at the spill site. It was said that media wasn’t allowed out there because of safety reasons, but because of our persistence to show the people of Utah what’s going on at their state park we were finally granted a tour.
WILLARD, Utah (ABC 4 News) – It’s been more than three weeks since the Chevron diesel spill in Willard Bay. ABC 4’s Kimberly Nelson has been pressuring Chevron, the Division of Water Quality and the state parks department about getting a first-hand look at the spill site. It was said that media wasn’t allowed out there because of safety reasons, but because of our persistence to show the people of Utah what’s going on at their state park we were finally granted a tour.

Chevron says the 760 mile pipeline that runs diesel from Salt Lake to Spokane has been repaired. It was a 72 inch seam that split open which allowed the 20,000 gallons of diesel to spill into Willard Bay. That's been fixed and the chevron pipeline is back up and running at 80%.

The company now says 476 barrels of diesel were released, or about 19,000 gallons, and about 2,700 gallons still need to be reclaimed. Most of that now is in the soil and sand near the beach.

It’s in this area where you can still smell diesel. It’s also where the diesel has seeped into the ground water.

“There's product making its way out to the bay,” said Baker. “We're seeing hits out beyond the booms and although they're low levels they are still there."

A drainage system has been put in place near the beach to catch and clean that ground water, and recent water samples show the diesel compounds out in the bay are non detectable.

The contamination levels at this time are not high enough to harm humans or wildlife, but the DWQ says there could be some impact if the diesel continues to seep into the ground water.

Chevron now says the clean-up efforts won’t likely be completed till sometime in June.
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