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New study shows HPV vaccine helping lower HPV infection rates in teen girls

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) – It’s been around for less than a decade and already the HPV vaccine has proven to dramatically reduce the cancer-causing virus in teenage girls. The Centers for Disease Control says cases of Human Papillomavirus are down 56%.
SALT LAKE CITY (ABC 4 Utah) – It’s been around for less than a decade and already the HPV vaccine has proven to dramatically reduce the cancer-causing virus in teenage girls. The Centers for Disease Control says cases of Human Papillomavirus are down 56%.

Each year about 19,000 women in the U.S. get cancer caused by HPV, and cervical cancer is the most common.

Dr. Krista Anders with Lone Peak OB/GYN told ABC 4 Utah, “In this country there is no reason for a woman to need to die of cervical cancer and yet it happens and it happens all too often.”

The Centers for Disease Control report took a look at look at girls and women ages 14-59 who had certain types of HPV before and after the vaccination program began in 2006. Among the girls, ages 14-19, the rate of infection was 56% lower in 2007-2010 than it was between 2003- 2006.

“If our children were vaccinated 4,400 new cases of cervical cancer could be avoided every year,” said Dr. Anders.

Doctors say this is an anti-cancer vaccine, but there still are parents who balk at the idea of having their children vaccinated, suggesting it would encourage sexual activity. The medical community says vaccinating them at a young age will protect them against cancer that can appear 20 to 40 years down the line.

“The idea is to catch everyone that could possibly get the disease and the idea behind that is to do that as young as possible,” explained Dr. Anders.

For more information on the CDC study log on to: http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2013/p0619-hpv-vaccinations.html

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